It’s Me

“Standing in the Need” is an African American spiritual, and, like many folk songs, its origin is unknown. Both text and tune became well known after their publication in The Book of American Negro Spirituals (1925), compiled by James Weldon Johnson and his brother,]. Rosamond Johnson.

Using hyperbole, or exaggerating to make a point, the text brings a very specific message: “I need prayer!” Obviously all the other persons mentioned in the text need prayer as well-yet the text stresses the individual’s need for prayer. Such an understanding of this text permits its use in corporate worship-in which we all realize that each of us needs prayer just as much as all of us need prayer. The text emphasizes personal responsibility within a larger context of community.

Liturgical Use:
As a call to prayer, this song should be part of a time of sung and spoken and silent prayers-for forgiveness, of course, but also for healing, for gratitude, for more fervent faith, and so on.

This song came to mind when I was reading Praying for Strangers.  One of the lessons the author learned is that everybody needs prayer.

It’s me, it’s me, O Lord,
standing in the need of prayer.
It’s me, it’s me, O Lord,
standing in the need of prayer.

1 Not my mother or my father, but it’s me, O Lord,
standing in the need of prayer;
not my mother or my father, but it’s me, O Lord,
standing in the need of prayer. [Refrain]

2 Not my brother or my sister, but it’s me, O Lord,
standing in the need of prayer;
not my brother or my sister, but it’s me, O Lord,
standing in the need of prayer. [Refrain]

3 Not the stranger or the neighbour, but it’s me, O Lord,
standing in the need of prayer;
not the stranger or my neighbour, but it’s me, O Lord,
standing in the need of prayer. [Refrain]

3 thoughts on “It’s Me

  1. Pingback: Deeply Rooted | Lutheran Ladies Connection

  2. Pingback: Let’s Go Down in the River to Pray | Lutheran Ladies Connection

  3. Pingback: Fix Me Jesus | Lutheran Ladies Connection

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.