The Light Shines in the Darkness

No one really knows the date of Jesus’ birth. A number of scholars believe it was in the spring, when shepherds would be out in the fields with their flocks. I’ve also heard some who claim it was in September or October, although I don’t remember their reasoning.

The early Christian church chose to celebrate some of their holy days at times when non-Christians already had festivals, so some people think the mass for Christ’s birth was scheduled for the end of December because many pagan groups celebrate the winter solstice, when the days begin to grow longer – hence, the return of the light. It wasn’t much of a stretch, then, to convince them to celebrate the coming of the Light of the World at that time of year. And this is why Light is our theme for December.

As John said (John1:1-5, 9-14): In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning. Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made. In him was life, and that life was the light of all mankind. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.

The true light that gives light to everyone was coming into the world. 10 He was in the world, and though the world was made through him, the world did not recognize him. 11 He came to that which was his own, but his own did not receive him. 12 Yet to all who did receive him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God— 13 children born not of natural descent, nor of human decision or a husband’s will, but born of God.

14 The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.

As we enter Advent, celebrating both the approaching Christmas season and the approaching return of Christ, may we lift up in prayer all who are going through dark times and all who live in darkness, and may we joyously look to the Light that forever banishes the darkness and brings us grace and love and peace.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized by Martha A. Moore (M.A. Moore). Bookmark the permalink.

About Martha A. Moore (M.A. Moore)

I used to define myself as a writer who worked in other fields for a living, but I've come to realize that I'm a teacher who likes to write occasionally in my spare time - which is not the calling of a full-time writer. Up until this year, I served as a classroom teacher for more than 30 years; this year I became a school administrator at a nondenominational Christian school in southeast Washington, DC. I'm an active member of Lutheran Church of the Cross-Missouri Synod in Rockville, MD, where I worship with my daughter and my three-year-old and seven-month-old granddaughters. I am also an active member of Vineyard Via de Cristo, and a lifetime member of the Girl Scouts. I sometimes write songs for VdC and for friends in Scouting. I've also written plays in the past for my church youth group and for some school students to perform. I am in the midst of rehab after open heart surgery in July 2017. I believe in God who is my Father and my Creator, God who is my Brother and my Savior, and God who is my Comforter and my Advocate - and God has made it abundantly clear that He believes in me and is always with me, whatever I may be going through. Soli Deo Gloria!

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