Saints on a Red Sea Road

Maybe some of you are curious, as I was, about Ellie Holcomb. I reviewed her  book for children a few posts back.  I had not heard of her, but here is one of her songs.  Let me know if you like it — I did.

 

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Saints Gathering Together

In church last Sunday we sang this well-known “Thanksgiving” hymn which speaks to me about the strength we find in gathering together as saints of God.  You may be surprised to learn something about its’ history!  It is actually of Dutch origin and refers religious persecution which occurred long before the first Thanksgiving.  The melody can be traced back to 1597.  It began as a folk song but was transformed into a hymn dealing with overcoming religious persecution on January 24th 1597.  That was the date of the Battle of Turnhout, in which Prince Maurice of Orange defeated the Spanish occupiers of a town in what is now the Netherlands.  At this point, the Dutch Protestants, who were prohibited from worshiping under the Spanish king, Phillip II, celebrated the victory by borrowing the familiar folk melody and giving it new words.  “We Gather Together” connoted a heretofore forbidden act—Dutch Protestants gathering together for worship.  It first appeared in print in a 1626 collection of Dutch patriotic songs.  Listen to the words and give thanks for the blessings we receive when we gather together.

For All the Saints

A month on the saints wouldn’t be complete without this favorite All Saint’s Day hymn.  Written by Bishop William Walsham How (1823-1897), the lyrics are based on the great cloud of witnesses described in Hebrews 12:1. Since I have taken this as my life verse, it’s not surprising that I love this song.  I hope our readers will, too.

You Say

Have you ever fought those feelings that make you feel like God is distant?  You can’t get close to the Lord?  You wonder if he’s even out there or if he even cares?  Maybe you’re going through a rough time right now and just can’t connect with God?

Even though it may be one of the hardest things to do you must believe that God’s in control.  He knows you better than you know yourself.  Our job is to get to know God through His Word.  This is so hard when you are going through a bad time.  I know, because I’ve been there.  There were days when I wondered if God even heard my pleas.  Then I would take a deep breath, close my eyes and just let peace be what I ask for.

The song “You Say” by Lauren Daigle says all this very well.  I believe….

 

 

Just As I Am

The author of this hymn, Charlotte Elliot(1789-1871) suffered from a disabling disease in her 30’s.  Her spiritual advisor counseled her to turn her inner rage at her condition into trust and peace with God.  This led her to begin writing hymns.  The simple, yet powerful message of Just As I Am has appealed to many evangelists over the years and is often used for altar calls (Lutherans don’t do this – but it is a favorite communion hymn).  Enjoy it and bathe in God’s redemption and acceptance.

 

Why Me Lord?

Kris Kristofferson wrote this song after attending a worship service during  a low point in his life.  My husband often plays it on the CD player in the car and I think it’s is one of the most genuine songs about repentance I’ve heard.  I love it, and I hope you will, too.

St. Francis Set to Music

If you like the St. Francis Prayer about transforming your environment by starting with yourself, I’m sure you’ll enjoy this musical version even more.  It’s been going around in my mind every since my last post.  Remember, he who sings, prays twice!