Category Archives: Songs on Monthly Theme

Blest Be the Tie That Binds

Standard

Perhaps you think of this as a hymn about marriage.  In researching, however, I found that it really speaks of the love between a Pastor and his congregation.  It was written by John Fawcett, who was born in 1740 in Yorkshire, England.  As a young tailor’s apprentice he became a Christian, and was often asked to speak at the Baptist church he attended.  When he was 25 and newly wed, he was asked to pastor a small church in Wainsgate.  The parish was quite poor, and often John and his wife were paid in potatoes and other produce.  It was hard to make ends meet.  After seven years at Wainsgate, he received a call from a larger, more prestigious congregation, able to pay him a much higher salary.  The family packed up to leave, but in the end, his wife, Mary said she didn’t see how they could leave the people who had come to mean so much to them.  John wrote this hymn as an expression of that love.

In Marriage Relationships

Standard

Marriage is like taking that huge step off a cliff and not knowing how it’s all going to end.  But for most marriage starts with two people, deeply in love, that commit to stay with each other until death do us part.  We have stars in our eyes and we know that life is going to be so wonderful.  Then the problems start.

Most marriages today don’t have the commitment factor that they used to.  Yes, I know that people have stayed in miserable conditions just because they married the person they have come to hate.  It takes two to commit together, two to stay together.  Two hearts need to stay as one.  During the wedding God knits two totally separate people and makes them one.

Now, my marriage wasn’t the greatest.  Both my husband and I had problems.  We actually separated for awhile and then came back together.  We learned to live together and we had a good relationship.  Was it the wonderful lifetime that I imagined when we stood at the altar, no.  It was hard work, but we made it through.  My husband has been gone for over two years now and I can look back and see all the good and bad.  One of the good things is that we were committed to keeping the vows, to stay together through it all.  And we did.

This song by Andrew Peterson totally pulled at me from the first time I heard it.  It is so truthful.  We should take the words to heart.  We shouldn’t just walk (or tiptoe) through the minefields in a marriage, we should go dancing through them.  Sail through the storms.  Knowing that Jesus is the Lord of the relationship should cause us to rejoice.  So, let’s go dancing!!

Remember Me, Lord

Standard

Do Lord is a traditional African-American spiritual, and the author is unknown.  I don’t know if it is based on a particular scripture, but when I wrote my post about the two thieves on the cross, this is the song that came to my mind. Connecting the song and Bible story make it more meaningful for me.  I hope you’ll enjoy this version sung by Johnny Cash.

In Remembrance of Me

Standard

We hear those words on Sunday when we take Communion.  We need to come to the altar with the mindset of remembering that Jesus died on the cross for us.

Being the music person I am, I found a song.  “Remember” by Laura Story is a beautiful song, very simple, but the words are true:

This is the body that was torn for us
This is the blood that was spilt
Points to the pain you endured for us
Points to the shame, the blame, the guilt

Father, Son and Holy Spirit, come
Move our hearts to remember

This is the Lamb who was slain for us
So we the church may enter in
So bitter sweet when we think of You
The One who bore our curse, our sin

Father, Son and Holy Spirit, come
Move our hearts to remember, to remember

Father, Son and Holy Spirit, come
Father, Son and Holy Spirit, come
Move our hearts to remember

 

Precious Memories

Standard

 Precious Memories was written by John Wright as he reflected on the loss of his parents and son. The song explains why the memory of the righteous is blessed.  Published in 1920 it quickly became an immediate hit with average people everywhere. Unfortunately the publishing company did not honor their original contract and John received only $36 for his song–the first and only payment.  He ended his life as a janitor of a local business.  How has God blessed you with precious memories?

A Prayer

Standard

This song by Eddie Espinosa has been around a while, but it’s always fresh.  I think of it as a prayer that is sung.

Change my heart Oh God, make it ever true.
Change my heart Oh God, may I be like You.
You are the potter, I am the clay,
Mold me and make me, this is what I pray.
Change my heart Oh God, make it ever true.
Change my heart Oh God, may I be like You.

A Sacrificial Change

Standard

“…Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but made himself nothing, taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men.”  Philippians 2:5-6

We think of the sacrifice Jesus made by dying on the cross, but do we even remember His first sacrifice?  God Himself gave up the glory of heaven to be incarnated as a helpless human baby.  What a humiliating change!  You might compare it to one of us becoming an ant, or a worm.  Yet He made that change for us. It reminds me of this beautiful hymn:

What Wondrous Love Is This
By: American Folk Hymn

What wondrous love is this, O my soul, O my soul!
What wondrous love is this, O my soul!
What wondrous love is this
That caused the Lord of bliss
To bear the dreadful curse for my soul, for my soul,
To bear the dreadful curse for my soul!

When I was sinking down, sinking down, sinking down,
When I was sinking down, sinking down,
When I was sinking down
Beneath God’s righteous frown,
Christ laid aside His crown for my soul for my soul,
Christ laid aside His crown for my soul.

To God and to the Lamb I will sing, I will sing;
To God and to the Lamb I will sing;
To God and to the Lamb,
Who is the great I AM,
While millions join the theme, I will sing, I will sing,
While millions join the theme, I will sing.

And when from death I’m free, I’ll sing on, I’ll sing on;
And when from death I’m free, I’ll sing on.
And when from death I’m free
I’ll sing His love for me,
And through eternity I’ll sing on, I’ll sing on,
And through eternity I’ll sing on.

Remember the resurrection could not have happened without the incarnation.  They are chapters of the same story — the story that changed us from being dead in our sins to alive in Christ.

The Story of “Abide With Me”

Standard

ABIDE WITH ME v.2

Swift to its close ebbs out life’s little day.

Earth’s joys grow dim; It’s glories pass away

Change and decay In all around I see:

O Thou, who changest not, abide with me!

This hymn was written by Henry Francis Lyte, who was vicar in the fishing village of Lower Brixham, Devonshire, England in 1847.  He suffered from a lung condition which deteriorated into tuberculosis.  After preaching his last sermon before leaving for a holiday in Italy, he walked along the coast in quiet prayer, then retired to his room, emerging an hour later with the hymn, “Abide With Me.”  His diseased lungs gave out a few months later.  “Abide With Me” was first sung at his memorial service.

Image result for images of abide with me