Remembering the Important Things

A few days ago, I attended the graduation ceremony of my twin nephews who have both been diagnosed with ASD (Autism Syndrome Disorder).  Their school meets in a church and is very small (5 in the graduating class) and Christian.  It has come to be a place where students who cannot easily “fit in” to the public school system,  not only survive, but thrive.

One of the speakers mentioned that people might try to put them down by insinuating that this kind of school could not have given them a quality education–too small;  not enough options;  unable to afford the best and latest technology.  However, how wrong this worldly wisdom is.  My nephews, Chris and Nick, had received the best possible education because they had learned the most important things:  they learned that God loves them, and they learned to love others, even those who are somehow “different.”  All the academic stuff (and they got plenty of that, too) is secondary.

“And behold, a lawyer stood up to put him to the test, saying, ‘Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?’  He said to him, “What is written in the Law?  How do you read it?’  And he answered, ‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and all your soul, and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.  And he (Jesus) said to him, ‘You have answered correctly;  do this and you will live.'”  Luke 10:25-28

Let’s all try to remember to live as if we’re really keeping the main thing (love for God and others) as the main thing in our lives.

Why We Sing

This article was originally published in The Lutheran Ambassador

Lutherans are known as “the singing church” and Martin Luther has been called “the father of congregational singing.” But why do we sing? Is it simply our tradition? Is it an appropriate way to express our emotions of gratitude and love toward God? Is it a biblically sanctioned part of worship (Psalm 66:1-2)? Does it help bind us together as a community? The answer is yes to all these questions about communal Christian singing in the Church. However, there is another excellent reason Lutherans sing: hymn singing is an important part of our Christian education.

Maybe you thought the children were just having fun singing all those Sunday School songs. They are having fun, but they are also learning about important people in the Bible (Father Abraham), the essentials of the faith (Jesus Loves Me), the proper response to God’s love (Praise Him, Praise Him, All You Little Children) and what it means to be part of the church (We Are the Church).

Setting words to music is an aid to memorization. Young people often learn the books of the Bible (in order no less) by singing a song. Adults who participate in a Lutheran liturgy discover they’ve memorized many Psalms and other portions of scripture by taking part in the worship service. Well chosen hymns also serve to reinforce the theme of the sermon and the readings of the day. And in times of crisis in our lives the comforting words of hymns bring the reminder of God’s eternal concern for His people to our minds and hearts.

Good hymns teach. They help us understand the different church seasons (O Come, O Come, Emmanuel). They prepare us for communion (Let Us Break Bread Together). They tell us about the attributes of God (A Mighty Fortress). They convict us of our sin (Amazing Grace). They explain theological concepts (The Church’s One Foundation) and give lessons in how to serve (Hark the Voice of Jesus Calling) and be more generous (We Give Thee But Thine Own). Some hymns are almost a sermon in themselves (Salvation Unto Us Has Come)!

Church music can touch our hearts and sink into our souls in a way that is hard to explain or understand. Church music can lift us up into the very realm of God’s presence. No wonder Luther called it “a fair and glorious gift of God.”