Martin Luther Quote #2 on Facing Challenges

“Suffering is the school in which God chastens us and teaches us to trust in him so that our faith may not always stay in our ears and hover on our lips but may have its true dwelling place in the depths of our hearts. Your grace is now in this school.” Martin Luther

For more quotes by Martin Luther see these posts:

Martin Luther on Hope

Martin Luther on Baptism

Martin Luther on God’s Victory Over Death

Dietrich Bonhoeffer– Facing Life’s Challenges Like Christ

“Jesus Christ lived in the midst of his enemies. At the end all his disciples deserted him. On the Cross he was utterly alone, surrounded by evildoers and mockers. For this cause he had come, to bring peace to the enemies of God. So the Christian, too, belongs not in the seclusion of a cloistered life but in the thick of foes. There is his commission, his work. ‘The kingdom is to be in the midst of your enemies. And he who will not suffer this does not want to be of the Kingdom of Christ; he wants to be among friends, to sit among roses and lilies, not with the bad people but the devout people. O you blasphemers and betrayers of Christ! If Christ had done what you are doing who would ever have been spared’ (Luther).”

Dietrich Bonhoeffer

For more quotes by Dietrich Bonhoeffer see:

Dietrich Bonhoeffer on Optimism

Dietrich Bonhoeffer on Faith

Dietrich Bonhoeffer on Times of Uncertainty

 

 

 

Martin Luther on Facing Challenges

“Inasmuch as tribulation serves the same purpose as rhubarb, myrrh, aloes, or an antidote against all the worms, poison, decay, and dung of this body of death, it ought not to be despised. We must not willingly seek or select afflictions, but we must accept those which God sees fit to visit upon us, for he knows which are suitable and salutary for us and how many and how heavy they should be.”

Martin Luther

For more Martin Luther quotes see:

Martin Luther on Uncertainty

Martin Luther on Charity

Martin Luther on Youth

Martin Luther on Hope

Unto him who is able to keep us from falling, and lift us from the dark to the bright mountain of hope, from the midnight of desperation to the daybreak of joy, to him be power and authority for ever and ever.”

by Martin Luther

For more Martin Luther quotes see these posts:

Martin Luther on Witnessing

A Thought From Martin Luther

Speak to One Another–Advice From Martin Luther

 

Martin Luther and the Holy Spirit

For more on how to read the Scripture, see these posts:

How to Read Scripture (according to John Stott)

Martin Luther on Reading the Bible

 

 

 

What Did Martin Luther Say about the Holy Spirit?

“I believe that by my own understanding or strength I cannot believe in Jesus Christ my Lord or come to him, but instead the Holy Spirit has called me through the gospel, enlightened me with his gifts, made me holy and kept me in the true faith, just as he calls, gathers, enlightens, and makes holy the whole Christian church on earth and keeps it with Christ in the one common true faith. Daily in this Christian church the Holy Spirit abundantly forgives all sins – mine and those of all believers. On the last day the Holy Spirit will raise me and all the dead and will give me and all believers eternal life. This is most certainly true.” (Martin Luther, “Small Catechism.” The Book of Concord: The Confessions of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. ed. Robert Kolb and Timothy J. Wengert. [Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2000], Third Article to the Creed, 355-356.)

For more quotes by Martin Luther, see these posts:

Martin Luther on God’s Victory Over Death

A Thought From Martin Luther

Martin Luther on our Rebirth in Faith

 

Martin Luther on Youth

“If you young fellows were wise, the devil couldn’t do anything to you, but since you aren’t wise, you need those of us who are old.”

Martin Luther

For more quotes by Martin Luther see these posts:

Martin Luther on Heavenly Blessings

Martin Luther on Sin

Martin Luther on Witnessing

 

Read More Books!

If you’ve been following this blog for a while, you probably realize that I am an avid reader.  I read a lot, and I read eclectically — I read theology, biographies and memoirs,  novels, and poetry.  I’m interested in the brain, spiritual disciplines, autism, leadership, creativity, spiritual gifts and more.  My children say they rarely see me without a book in my hand.  I’m convinced that reading not only educates you, it makes you a better person, because you learn about the feelings and experiences of others.

Right now I’m working on a bulletin board at our church that will deal with lifelong learning, and books in particular.  Martin Luther wrote over 600 books and here are some of the things he had to say about the subject:

“There never yet have been, nor are there now, too many good books.” 

Martin Luther

One Book is enough, but a thousand books is not too many.”       

Martin Luther

“Every book is a great action, and every great action is a book.”

Martin Luther

So my message today is simple:  MAKE MARTIN LUTHER PROUD!  READ MORE BOOKS!

For some reviews of books you might enjoy, see these posts:

Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen–Book Review

What the Bible Says About Purpose by David Ramos–Book Review

the thank-you project by Nancy Davis Kho–Book Review

 

 

Martin Luther on Doing Good

It is easy enough to do good once or twice, but to keep on doing good without getting disgusted with the ingratitude of those whom we have benefited, that is not so easy.

Martin Luther

For more quotes on Martin Luther, follow these links:

Martin Luther on the Fruit of the Spirit

Martin Luther on God’s Victory Over Death

Martin Luther on Sin

 

Most Certainly True

If you’ve read or been trained in the Lutheran Catechism, you’ll be familiar with the phrase, “this is most certainly true.”  It appears at the end of each of Luther’s explanations, a reminder that although most of life is uncertain, the things of the faith are not.  Recently my husband and I were vacationing near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina where we were visiting with our daughter and our grandchildren.  We attended a Presbyterian Church one Sunday and I loved their confession of sin, because what it told me is most certainly true:

 From the Westminster Confession of Faith 15.4 (Of Repentance Unto Life).                                                                                                                                                      No sin is so small that it does not deserve damnation.  Nor is any sin so great that it can bring damnation upon those who truly repent.

Romans 8:1

“There is therefore no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.”

(If you’re unfamiliar with the Westminster Confession of Faith, it is a systematic exposition of Calvinism, written from a Puritan viewpoint. It was originally drafted to reform the Church of England and to unify the various Christian sects in England at that time.  It addresses a variety of church doctrines).

Often people feel uncertain about whether their sins are really forgiven.  Maybe they have trouble forgiving themselves; maybe they are afraid that something they have done is so bad, it just isn’t forgivable. Martin Luther himself suffered from this anxiety.  He confessed over and over again without feeling absolved.  On the other hand, some are convinced their sins are so small, they don’t need forgiveness.  They are “good” people, at least in comparison to others. Neither attitude is correct.  We all need forgiveness, and through the atonement of Christ, we can all receive forgiveness.  Of that you can be certain.

For more on forgiveness see  these posts:

The Opportunity of Forgiveness

Forgiveness for Ourselves

Forgiveness: It Does a Body Good